4/4/2012 - Scoutmaster Minute

posted Apr 22, 2012, 7:44 AM by Lonnie Rimmer

The Origin of the Left Hand Shake
The left hand shake goes way back to the origins of Scouting, and was inspired like many original Scouting concepts, by Baden-Powell’s Army career.

When Captain Baden-Powell entered the capital city of the Ashanti people in 1896 he was met by one of the chiefs who came to him holding out his left hand.  Baden-Powell held out his right hand in return but the Chief said "No, in my country the bravest of the brave shake with the left hand".

This was because African Warriors typically carried a spear in the right hand and a shield in the left.  To shake left-handed meant you had to put down your shield and put your life in the hands of the other person.

As the new scouts get acquainted into our troop, they will soon find out that, while we aren’t putting anyone’s lives in danger, they will experience a process where they soon learn that they can’t do this alone. Transitioning into boy scouts is just that – a process – and to jump-start this, we are headed to Verdun Adventure Bound camp later this month. The scouts will be going through a series of team building exercises and challenge courses.  They will be required to “lean” on other scouts, in that they must participate as a TEAM to complete the challenge.  In this system, as they “put down their shield” they will be putting their scouting lives into the hands of their fellow scouts. What a better uway to acclimate into a new troop!

Before you know it (and maybe even before you are ready), your recent Webelos graduate will be showing more bravery, maturity, and responsibility than you could ever imagine.

All this from a left hand shake.

Boy Scout Troop 2860 Scoutmaster
Greg Smith

12/13/2011 - Mr. Wheeler's Final Scoutmaster Minute

posted Dec 22, 2011, 5:35 PM by Paul Diming



Where has the time gone?

Look closely and you’ll find touches of time’s passage. Its traces shine in the faces of our sons. Young men’s boyhood features and mannerisms fading. Rising in their place is the demeanor of a man.

It tears at my heart to see my son so grown.  I’m bursting with parental pride to see the man he is becoming while fighting memories fade of his youthful days filled with wonder and joy.  Playful boyhood energies are still within him.  They peek through his layers of maturity winking their reminder of time’s passing. 
What I’m also reminded of is that my work is unfinished.  He needs a parent more now, perhaps, than ever. 
 
I recall a conversation I had with one of our Scouts a year or more ago.  He confided that he was apprehensive about growing up.  Scared, I think, was his word.  His future coming at him too fast, unstoppable, without his invitation and despite his state of readiness.  

My wife and I chose to delay knowledge of our child’s gender until he was born.  That was almost sixteen years ago.  His birth brought clarity that one day we would be at this life juncture, he a young man, and I a seasoned parent.  
The challenge of parenting morphs with time’s passage.  At grade school days beginning your son is immersed into a sea of influences outside a parent’s control.  Sorting through this sea we found Scouting.  

Parents readily identify the value of the tenets of Scouting and want them to be pillars of their son’s life.  The strength of a Scouting partnership becomes immediately apparent.  I signed on as a Tiger Den leader without hesitation.  

With the awesome Jeff Lee taking lead as Cub Master and I at the helm of our son’s Den, we set our sail and tack, our course and destination not clearly known. 
What was known was that my son would grow to be a man.  He was doing so too fast, unstoppable, without invitation, and despite our state of readiness.  
The years pass quickly.  One parenting challenge washes over you and another forms.  Life plays its hand and you ante up as best you can.  
Somehow I found myself as Scoutmaster for my son’s Troop.  For three years I’ve welcomed Scouting’s passionate spirit to ebb over me as I helped set our Troop’s sails and tack.  My life of ten years of Scouting and almost sixteen years of parenting now absorbed by my son and the young men I’ve help mentor.

To answer the question, I know exactly where time has gone.  All the years of shared adventures, meetings, projects…life.  The results displayed by poised and confident young men towering over a bedrock steady foundation.  Our Troop and their Scouting being a significant pillar of this foundation.  

Our work is not done.  Our time is not finished.  Our sons are not yet grown.  Have confidence when looking to the future.  Our program sails are strong and the tiller of values firmly set.
I offer a message to my son and all of our sons.  Don’t be afraid.  Your time is coming fast and unstoppable.  Greet the winds of life with invitation and know that you are ready.  Strengthen your foundation pillars with the values of Scouting, with the values of your parents, with your values as a man.  Honor this time with your future and you will honor your mentors.  Let life fill your sails.  Set your tack and true your course with your values no matter the destination.  You are prepared for your time.

Boy Scout Troop 2860 Scoutmaster
December 2008 – December 2011
Mark Wheeler

10/26/2011 - T2860 Scoutmaster Transition

posted Nov 18, 2011, 10:36 AM by Paul Diming

Greetings Troop!  These are exciting times for our Troop.  Last night we reminded the Scouts that my term as Scoutmaster will end in December.  Mr. Greg Smith will be transitioning into the Scoutmaster role at that time.  The Scoutmaster serves at the direct appointment by our sponsor, WUMC.  WUMC Scouting Community Organization Representative (COR), Mr. Tom McKee, has approved the appointment of Mr. Smith as the next T2860 Scoutmaster.  There will be a brief ceremony at the December Court of Honor and Holiday party to celebrate the transition.

The transition of our Scoutmaster role is a wonderful example of positive change that all Troops must undergo to stay healthy.  I would encourage you to discuss the lesson of change with your Scout to recognize it as a constant within everyone’s life.  It should be acknowledged that change is often greeted with unpleasant feelings of apprehension.  Changes in our lives are inevitable.  They are best managed when greeted with prayer and faith.  To do our duty to God includes trusting him as we experience change.

The learning point for our Scouts provided by our Troop Scoutmaster transition demonstrates an excellent example of a change that is positive, well planned, and fully supported by our program.  Even presented in the most positive light, however, I’ve learned that young men often greet change with distrust.  I’d like to fully allay those feelings.  

Scoutmaster Smith is a wonderful leader who has eagerly embraced the importance of providing a nurturing and positive Scouting experience for our sons.  T2860 is blessed with many fantastic leaders who will be a part of Mr. Smith’s leadership team.  Our program has never been stronger.  Scoutmaster Smith has an exceptional springboard of program strength that will move us into the future as we continue the T2860 legacy.

I plan to remain an active participant as part of the Troop adult leadership team.   The role of Scoutmaster takes time and experience to fully establish a firm grasp upon and I will assure that Mr. Smith receives my full support in this regard.  It is extremely important that we all support Mr. Smith as he works to guide our program and advise our Scout leadership.  Our event operation tempo requires an extraordinary level of commitment as Scoutmaster.  It most assuredly requires a team effort.  

We share the commonality of wanting our son’s Scouting experience to be fully successful.  Many of us have linked our parenting efforts closely to the Scouting program.  Your direct involvement is required for the program to successfully support your efforts to raise a wonderful young man.  I know you’ve heard it before but your support has never been more important than when our Scouts are experiencing a change in Scoutmaster.  

How can you help?  Send a note to Mr. Smith offering your pledge of support.  gregsmith15@verizon.net  Let him know he has a team with a shared passion for our Scouting program.  Taking on the Scoutmaster role for a Troop of 100 boys requires extraordinary faith.  Let him know you’ll pray for him and his success as Scoutmaster.  Better yet, stand ready to take direct charge of an event or offer significant support for a specific task.  I can tell you from personal experience that my Scouting spirit was the highest when I would ask for help and there was an immediate reply.  It is when you offer to take direct action to get jobs done for our scouts that I found my faith refreshed and my enthusiasm as Scoutmaster rekindled.  

Let’s jump start Scoutmaster Smith’s term with a fantastic offering of support that will set our course for the future of T2860…”The Best There Is”!

T2860SM 
Mark Wheeler

06/21/2011 - T2860 Vantage Point

posted Sep 12, 2011, 7:08 AM by Paul Diming

Greetings Troop.  Lately I’ve spent a great deal of time on the far end of Scouting.  Please allow me to share with you some observations from this vantage point. 

You’ll have to forgive me about my lack of understanding of what a regular parent’s perspective is about the Scouting program.  I don’t think I’ve ever been what amounts to a typical parent.  I started Scouting with my little Tiger Scout as a newly minted Den Leader.  From day one I was committed to the program and the success of it for my son and the many others involved.  No one in the room that day we joined Scouting with our Tigers could have known the amazing life changing adventure we had just started.  

Nine years of Scouting has placed me in the position of seeing the results of the Scouting program as represented in Scouts completing Eagle Scout Rank.  These Scouts are just beginning a new chapter of their lives and it’s my honor to assist them at this important stage of their Scouting career.  

I’ve had some incredible conversations with our T2860 Eagle Scouts.  Also, last week I attended the Buckskin Scoutmasters conference and was offered understanding of a program designed with extraordinary power to teach and empower young men.   It is humbling and inspiring to see the effect a successful Scouting experience has on a young man.  

Obviously the young men represented in our older Scouts are the product of a very complex mosaic of experiences including many years of hard parenting work and effort.  Scouting is just one small part.  But when you talk with them, and more importantly listen to them, it is with their own words that they tell you how much Scouting has affected them.  Inevitably when we’re together there is the recounting of camping adventures, misadventures, adversities overcome, and many laughs often at each other’s expense, that are told and retold among friends.  

If I were to darken out my son’s Scouting experiences, I’m unsure of how I’d fill in the void.  To be honest, I don’t know of any way to do so.  This program when wielded with your other parenting efforts is truly a strengthening for a family.  This may not be fully understood and that is to my point.  

Please allow me to be clear with this message.  I want more than anything for your Scout to reap all the program can offer.  But there’s this little catch.  You can’t bring your son to it and hope it will work for him without your direct involvement.  The key ingredient for every successful Scout, and every successful Troop program, are involved parents.  Parents who lead, teach merit badges, go to training, attend committee meetings, help with ceremonies and events, and critically important is to answer pleas for assistance the Scouts have asked for as they strive to run their Troop.  Even with your committed involvement a boy might not continue in Scouting.  

So what’s in it for you, a parent who is killing weekends, nights, more hours that we could possibly track, with all this scouting?  I’ve seen the results.  You’re going to meet the most amazing young man you didn’t even know existed.  Your son.

T2860SM
Mark Wheeler

12/29/2010 - They are more than words to me

posted Jan 7, 2011, 6:02 PM by Paul Diming

Greetings Troop!  Several of our Scouts have been actively working on their final steps towards Eagle Scout rank.  Two of our scouts recently had their projects approved by the Arrohattoc District committee.  Another two scouts have completed their Scoutmaster Conferences and one is holding his Eagle Scout rank Board of Review tonight.

I believe it’s important for me to share with you, particularly our first and second year parents, how incredibly important scouting became and continues to be for our recent Eagle candidates.  From their own words:

Scout 1: “scouting is who I am, it’s in my blood…we’re a scout family”
Scout 2: “you don’t earn Eagle Scout as much as you become an Eagle Scout”
Scout 3: “you can’t separate Eagle Scout from who you are, it becomes part of you”…”I learned the true meaning of the Scout Oath and Law…they are more than words to me”

So how did these Scouts get to this point?  What’s the formula?  How do you inspire your young Scout to reach this goal?

One common denominator every single Eagle Scout has is a devoted family who supported him and his Troop throughout his Scouting career.  Let’s take a closer look at the recent candidate’s home support.

Scout 1 – Parents have been supporting T2860 for over a decade.  Scout 1’s brother is a principle leader at Buckskin Leadership Camp, one of our nations highest recognized youth leadership programs.  Scout 1’s resume would be the envy of any adult with a long list of major leadership accomplishments including commissioning his own Venture unit, an extremely rare youth accomplishment on a national scale.  Scout 1’s father has been and continues to be a principle financial supporter of our Troop.  Scout 1’s mother is always on point with every Troop family event.  I can depend on her to replying back whenever I need help on a task.  Much of what T2860 is today is the direct result of the efforts of Scout 1’s family.

Scout 4 – Father of Scout 4 has stepped up to ASM and front line leadership role.  He is one of four T2860 Life to Eagle coordinators and is a principle leader in the troop.  Scout 4’s mother is always willing to help.  The father’s adult leadership in the troop has significantly inspired both Scout 4 and his brother as they work towards their scouting goals.

Scout 3 – Parents continue to be a principle inspiration supporting Scout 3’s bid for Eagle and have long supported T2860.  As Scout 3 noted last night, “Mom is kind of a pain but I’m extremely thankful for her support”.  Scout 3’s mother frequently communicates with me to stay on top of everything her son needs or she needs to know to support him and his troop.  

Scout 2 – Parents are major T2860 supporters and long term supporters of Scouting.  Scout 2’s father is a T2860 ASM holding the lead role for our Life to Eagle Coordinators.  He is a principle leader for our District, has worked as a unit commissioner, and continues to train and lead on many levels of local and regional Scouting.  

Do you see a pattern here?  It takes a willing Scout, that’s a given.  All I can offer you is that the common element I see in every Eagle candidate, besides a wonderful young man who has worked hard to develop into an Eagle Scout, is a seriously involved parent or parents who helped lead their son’s Troop and his efforts towards his highest Scouting goal.  I’m not saying you all need to be tan shirt wearing front line ASM leaders for your son to be successful in Scouting.  I can offer to you that your son’s best chance of a fully successful scouting career rests principally on how involved you are in his troop and his scouting efforts.  Even with your full support the odds are against him statistically.  

I can’t put you all in the room with an Eagle candidate like Scouts 2 and 3 and have you experience the unbelievable inspiration a young man of their caliber has on those of us honored with helping them take the final steps to Eagle.  I can only assure you, without reservation, that you would not hesitate to do everything in your power to help bring your son to that moment.  

You have a son who is a Scout.  His troop needs you and he needs your support.  It’s not a small thing we’re doing here.  

From their own words, it’s one of the most important achievements of their lives.

T2860SM
Mark Wheeler

11/4/2010: Assistant Scoutmasters (ASM's)

posted Nov 4, 2010, 8:03 PM by Paul Diming



What is an ASM? What is a really good ASM? 

There's no mystery here. Assistant Scout Masters fill a key role by supporting our scouts and keeping our program in tip top shape. ASMs do many jobs but there's a difference between an ASM and a helpful parent. 

You wear the uniform and hopefully have participated in BSA training. This puts you in a leadership role for the scouts. Your understanding of the BSA program, the patrol method, and how a boy lead troop is designed to function is critical to knowing how to support the scouts. 

So what makes a really good ASM? What would be the most help to me as SM? 

Here are a few suggestions: 

Safety - without out a doubt, safety falls on the adult leadership shoulders. All ASMs should have a roving eye towards what is safe, not safe, and what is just boys being boys. We all have different tolerances here but common sense is called for with the error of caution being the bottom line. 

Information - have a current list of merit badge councilors, troop member names, phone numbers, addresses, troop schedule, etc… It would really help me to not be the only one in the room with troop info. If you had a binder with pertinent troop info, that would be great. We ask the boys to keep binders. It would help me if ASMs have one also. 

Blue Cards - know the blue card procedure and how to fill one out. On our web site there is helpful info about blue cards. Look for the .pdf file at the bottom for help on how to fill one out. http://sites.google.com/a/troop860.org/public/Home/advancement <http://sites.google.com/a/troop860.org/public/Home/advancement> 

Spend more time with scouts than adults - If you go to a meeting wearing the BSA uniform and don't work with a scout, something may not be quite right. Fellowship with adults is an important aspect of adult scouting. But as a leader in uniform, you are there primarily to help the scouts. This takes time and persistence to develop a working relationship between you and the boys. Boys are generally weary of adults so this takes time to build trust. Doing so with little things like saying hello, talking to them briefly, asking if they need anything signed off or have any questions that you can help with, all helps them to know you. Being consistent with attending and being open to helping the boys are key. Try to learn all of their names. That’s some of the first advice I give the Den Chiefs and it holds true for ASMs also. 

Say hello to all the parents in attendance. T860 has a culture of being open and friendly. We all have the commonality of having son's in scouting and a shared view of principles we'd like our son's to embrace. Most importantly, we all want to participate in something important and have lasting friendships. Every person in scouting, parent and scout alike, are primarily seeking friendship and fellowship. By simply saying hello and greeting people warmly, you may help to do much more for someone than you realize. 

Keep your eye on me and the senior scout leaders. If I look frazzled, it's because I am frazzled. Ask if there is something that needs done. Help parents with general questions so I can focus on the boys. Keep your eye on the senior scout leaders and be near anything that looks like it's going out of control. Your presence may be all it takes to calm a rowdy situation. 

If you have sons who are older scouts, talk with them about their key role in the troop. They must make the transition from "this is fun" to "this is important" and they have an important job of bringing scouting to the younger scouts in addition to completing their highest scouting goals. 

Have realistic expectations. The boys mostly just want to have fun. Along the way, we sneak in lessons, offer many chances to practice leadership, and help them take initiative about their scouting. Each scout has a wavering scout valve of either full open to mostly shut. You never know where they are. One thing is certain, the more a scout is involved in his troop, the further immersed he becomes in the ideals of scouting. 

Be enthusiastic – Let your scouting passion run wild. It’s contagious to everyone. It’s ok to be a scout geek. Your dedication is infectious to your son. Try not to overshadow him (unlike my own involvement). It’s THEIR troop, we just help support it. 

I hope this helps a little. While I know WE as adults could run a stellar troop, it’s not ours to run. But it is our job; mine in particular, to guide the troop. I’ll work with the senior scout leadership, scout officers, the ASMs, many helpful adults, and the troop adult committee to help guide the troop’s course. Dean specializes as Life to Eagle coordinator and does many tasks with the scout officers and the OA. Many of you have specific jobs on the committee or otherwise. Collectively, we are the force that moves our program forward. The boys tell us what they want to do and we wrangle resources to allow them to execute. Along the way we teach the most valuable lessons we will ever offer our sons. 

By example we demonstrate being a good person, a father, a citizen, a leader, and all we want for them to be. They are watching you and me and searching for who they are. 

Let’s do our best. 

T860SM 

Mark Wheeler

08/10/2010: Faith

posted Aug 25, 2010, 11:37 AM by Paul Diming

There’s a talk we have with the Scouts every now and then that most parents don’t get to hear. It centers around faith.

When a very young boy, Tiger age, is a Scout, everything is pretty cool. It’s fun, not too hard, camping is involved and it’s very exciting. Even with the many wonderful attributes of Scouting, boys find their interest in other activities and the Scouting enrolment ranks dwindle as they progress to Webelos. Even fewer make it to Boy Scouting.

There’s a lot of pressure on a youth to not do Scouting, mostly from their peers who haven’t a clue what they are talking about, but seem to find pleasure in demeaning Scouting. Sometimes it comes from an adult in authority at school (or an elected official) who doesn’t value or understand the program and omits encouraging a youth to continue his Scouting career. Demanding mandatory attendance of a youth at after school events is one example. A public educational system that fails to value parental teaching that takes place outside school hours is another. Weekend homework is my favorite pet peeve.

All this leads to where we started. Faith. To stay in Scouting, those involved must have faith that the program is worthwhile. You may have heard the phrase, “I believe in Scouting”. It took me years to decipher what was behind the intent of those words. I thought, of course I believe in the program, what, are you crazy? This is a great program! The best ever! Step outside Scouting circles, as our sons do every day, however, and you’ll find the doubt that gives rise to the phrase.

As we tell the Scouts at camp, they are doing the right thing, involved in a great program, developing themselves through their involvement in the program in the right way. They may have faith in what they are doing.

And then along comes the Boy Scouts of America Jamboree. Tens of thousands of Scouts from around the world gathered together. Their faith in the program affirmed on an epic scale. The heart of our nation resides at Fort A.P Hill for 10 days with tentacles of strength resonating to every corner of Scouting on the globe.

Let the Jamboree strengthen and affirm your faith, and your son’s faith, in Scouting. He needs this more than you know.

06/21/2011 - T2860 Vantage Point

posted Aug 25, 2010, 11:37 AM by Paul Diming

Greetings Troop.  Lately I’ve spent a great deal of time on the far end of Scouting.  Please allow me to share with you some observations from this vantage point. 

You’ll have to forgive me about my lack of understanding of what a regular parent’s perspective is about the Scouting program.  I don’t think I’ve ever been what amounts to a typical parent.  I started Scouting with my little Tiger Scout as a newly minted Den Leader.  From day one I was committed to the program and the success of it for my son and the many others involved.  No one in the room that day we joined Scouting with our Tigers could have known the amazing life changing adventure we had just started.  

Nine years of Scouting has placed me in the position of seeing the results of the Scouting program as represented in Scouts completing Eagle Scout Rank.  These Scouts are just beginning a new chapter of their lives and it’s my honor to assist them at this important stage of their Scouting career.  

I’ve had some incredible conversations with our T2860 Eagle Scouts.  Also, last week I attended the Buckskin Scoutmasters conference and was offered understanding of a program designed with extraordinary power to teach and empower young men.   It is humbling and inspiring to see the effect a successful Scouting experience has on a young man.  

Obviously the young men represented in our older Scouts are the product of a very complex mosaic of experiences including many years of hard parenting work and effort.  Scouting is just one small part.  But when you talk with them, and more importantly listen to them, it is with their own words that they tell you how much Scouting has affected them.  Inevitably when we’re together there is the recounting of camping adventures, misadventures, adversities overcome, and many laughs often at each other’s expense, that are told and retold among friends.  

If I were to darken out my son’s Scouting experiences, I’m unsure of how I’d fill in the void.  To be honest, I don’t know of any way to do so.  This program when wielded with your other parenting efforts is truly a strengthening for a family.  This may not be fully understood and that is to my point.  

Please allow me to be clear with this message.  I want more than anything for your Scout to reap all the program can offer.  But there’s this little catch.  You can’t bring your son to it and hope it will work for him without your direct involvement.  The key ingredient for every successful Scout, and every successful Troop program, are involved parents.  Parents who lead, teach merit badges, go to training, attend committee meetings, help with ceremonies and events, and critically important is to answer pleas for assistance the Scouts have asked for as they strive to run their Troop.  Even with your committed involvement a boy might not continue in Scouting.  

So what’s in it for you, a parent who is killing weekends, nights, more hours that we could possibly track, with all this scouting?  I’ve seen the results.  You’re going to meet the most amazing young man you didn’t even know existed.  Your son.

T2860SM
Mark Wheeler

06/30/2010 - Friendship

posted Jun 29, 2010, 10:23 PM by Paul Diming

Friendship.
It's a reoccurring theme I'm hearing from almost every Webelos II parent and leader I speak with. Will my son find a friend in your troop? Will he be accepted? Are the current scouts open to new friendships or will they shun new scouts? New parents to the troop are seeking the same acceptance.

This is a serious topic. A scout who is treated badly will likely not continue in scouting. That is a massive loss for a young boy and his family. Few new parents or scouts have an understanding of the potential impact scouting can have on the lives of those who participate. Scouting changes lives.

This topic is very important to me personally. My nearest relatives are 2,300 miles away. This troop is my family and my friends are all here. I know many of you feel the same way. T860 took Grayson and me in. The fact that I cooked six Dutch oven cobblers at our first camp probably didn't hurt matters. J

Please do this for me. Speak to your son about how important it is for him to be friendly to other scouts, particularly the new scouts when they visit, and as we receive new scouts during crossover in March. I'm not asking anyone to put on a false front or be disingenuous. Just be friendly and kind to the new guys. Be open to new friendships. As Harold so easily sums it up, "to have friends you have to be friendly".

If I were to ask an adult what are the most important things in your life, friends would be at the very top of the list. Scouts treasure friendships equally. How can you help your scout make friends and be friendly? By setting an example. T860 has a wonderful culture of being a welcoming troop. It's extremely important that we actively transmit that culture to scouts and families looking for acceptance with us. Doing so embodies who we are…

T860 The Best There Is…

06/16/2010 - Time

posted Jun 16, 2010, 7:48 AM by Paul Diming

Time. I’m frequently asked about it. “Where do you get the time to do all the scouting”? If you’re interested, here’re my thoughts on the matter and why I do what I do.

I’m sure we share something in common. We want the best for our children. You want them to grow up strong, smart, compassionate, good citizens and have loving families of their own. There’s a problem with that. There’s no instruction manual providing how to help our children embrace and reach that goal.

You know where I’m going with this already, but here’s the deal. I figure my best shot is to follow a successful playbook. BSA has a 100 year record of helping boys reach manhood with values, morals, skills, leadership and much more. I enjoy scouting, my son likes it, it’s good for my family, I don’t see a down side.

So what drives me to this level of commitment? Fear. Plain and simple. I see it every day. Young men in trouble. In trouble with the law, drugs, money, bad associates they mistake for friends, having children way too early, futures dimmed by clouds of problems. Scouting can’t clear all that away. I have no delusions of that. But it scares me that my son and yours could follow this path.

Scouting gives me something to work with. It’s a proven program. As long as I can keep my son’s interest in it, I’ll keep pushing to bring him all that BSA has to offer. And I’m keenly aware that my son’s interest in scouting is very much linked to my passion for it.

When everyone you know has written you off as certifiably nuts for pouring all your resources into your son’s scouting program, they’re missing the end game goal. Your son reminds you of that goal every day.

Where do I find the time? I find it every time I look at my son. I see it as a carefully choreographed unfolding of life. His and mine swirling together before he breaks out on his own. He’ll eventually back down on scouting involvement as will I. He’ll be a man, I’ll be old. I’ll have done all I can to help him set his path, his future clear. I’ll buy a Harley and a bunch of leather stuff. People will still think I’m crazy.

Be crazy like me. He’s worth your best shot. Scouting has a program for your son. They both need you.

T860SM

Mark Wheeler

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